Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Life in Kenya

I'm trying to get caught up on posting my pictures so this is the fourth post I've done today.  I think I'm a zombie now.  At least my brain is a zombie!  Just wanted to share some more pictures.  I tried to find a photo book that truly shows life in Kenya but all I could find were animal books or books about the Maasi tribe.  But I wanted a book that showed the many cultures that are here.  Since I couldn't find a book like that, I tried to take more pictures of people.  I don't like to take photos without asking permission so I often take the backs of people!  So here's a few more pictures.  Don't forget to click on the pictures to enlarge.


People here are very creative.  Look at what is being used to hold the sugar cane onto the wagon.  Ladders are also made of simple poles.  They use what they have handy.

These flat-topped Acacia trees say "Africa" to me.  But Kenyans don't like to be called "Africans."  Africa is a huge continent and the countries are not tied together like the countries of the EU nor like the states in the US.  So Kenyans are Kenyans.

They have passing lanes going up hills.  The funny thing is that anyone can use the passing lane -- those going up the hill or those going down.  So you really have to watch, especially going around corners.

So many kinds of flowering trees here.

Kisumu has LOTS of tuk-tuks -- these 3-wheeled motorcycle engine covered carts.  They're very cheap to ride so they tell me.  LeRon and I rode on some in Thailand but they were open to the air.  Our mission rules don't allow us as seniors to ride in tuk-tuks.

This tuk-tuk is loaded!

"For some must push and some must pull . . . "  Kenyans don't have to imagine pushing or pulling handcarts because they do it all the time.  Heavy loads too.

Trying to get more photos of people . . .

So many cultures and nationalities here.

More people pictures.  People walk everywhere.

You can only see two young women in the beautiful blue dresses but there were actually three.  Women mostly wear dresses except for in the city but even there they usually wear dresses.

The little children are so cute.

I wonder what he's selling.

This matatu was going full speed down the highway with the young man hanging on to the roof and the doorway.

Cows, even in the second largest city in Kenya (Kisumu), are a common sight.

I call Kisumu "tuk-tuk city."  So many tuk-tuks.

This is a gorgeous flowering tree but I'm too tired to look it up to find out what it is.  Maybe someone can help me?
A close-up of the gorgeous flowering tree.

I never get tired of seeing women carrying things on their heads.

Stone houses work better in termite country!

Look closely and you can see a pivot sprinkler irrigating the cropland.

What in the world does this bumper sticker mean?

More fish for sale.  What would we do in our truck with fresh fish and 200 miles to go?


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